Teacher Recruitment for China

China is rapidly becoming the 'go to' destination for young people looking to work in learning centres, and teachers looking for an excellent school environment to work in 

They all have wonderfully behaved pupils, a great team spirit with fellow colleagues, and in a fascinating and exciting country and culture in which to live

We have jobs in cities throughout China, many based in the dynamic metropolis of Shanghai: see here

What makes China the ideal destination in Asia for young people to consider teaching?

The answer is pretty simple: This is where you will find the highest salaries in all of the popular Asian countries, which along with low living expenses enables teachers to save a lot of their money.

From all parts of China it is very quick and easy with low travel fares to go all over Asia in your holiday time to visit the wonderful neighbouring countries and enjoy the beaches and cultural sites.
The history and cultural opportunities in China itself are well enough known to offer a staggering array of travel experiences, and are a must for all to see and experience while staying in the country.

           

What is life like as a teacher in China compared to western countries?
The difference is huge.
Teachers in China have the highest level of 'public respect of professionals' according to a survey conducted across 21 major countries. “They are revered” is the statement made by the British professor who compiled the study.
Children are very well brought up to be courteous and respectful, making life teaching them a joy. There is no classroom issues and bad behaviour associated with reports that regularly come out of countries in the west.

Children may seem to be ‘over trained’ in behaving themselves so well, but they generally take part in school ‘military exercises’ every week, even when young, which is part of their school week programme. This gives them an early understanding for having good discipline. Teachers coming to China find them wonderful to teach and work with.

     

How is the general tidiness and cleanliness of schools and accommodation?
With booming affluence the country is changing to one of clean and tidy cities with amazing architecture and buildings, all which have high quality and immaculate schools and classrooms.

Living spaces in apartments too can be of extremely high standard at very low prices compared to many other countries.
See example photos here.

Some of the centres and facilities are literally ‘state of the art’.
See example photos here.

     

What about the air quality?
An item that is often mentioned when considering China is the air quality. This has improved rapidly in recent years and continues to do so. It is rare now to have any poor air quality even in such cities as Shanghai. Also, it is really only in the very North where this is ever a problem, where cold weather brings more cloud on top of cities.
The government are very aware of the issue and there are extensive programmes happening continuously to lessen and alleviate this.

     

Living costs
Overall, living costs are low in China, far lower than the UK. For example Apartments even in the major cities rent at about 0.1% of their value. A typical 2-bed flat of excellent quality, in a good location such as the Chaoyang district in Beijing (the international sector and Embassy area) can be only £4-500 per month.

Eating out can be very low indeed, making cooking at home not worth the effort or expense.  Supermarket prices are generally lower than European prices, although western brands are more expensive.  Entertainment is extensive and in the bigger cities there are large 'expat' communities, all easy to become involved with, and all on various WeChat 'groups'.
See more about living costs and exploring here

Travel costs around China itself are low, with taxis, trains and flights much less than western countries and hugely efficient!

   

CONTACT US ABOUT THESE OPPORTUNITIES NOW - For Europe, South Africa and UAE:

Eva at europeoffice@meridian-education.com 

For Canada and USA: Kristy at canadaoffice@meridian-education.com 

Teaching at English Learning Centres


Enjoy an amazing, cultural and fun experience in teaching basic English to all ages from very young up to teenagers at 'English Learning Centres'.  In some Centres there is adult teaching also.

We have jobs in many of the top Tier 1 cities with all ages of children, mainly in Shanghai and surrounding cities.  In Beijing at the moment it is with kindergartens only.

Watch some clips here of life in Shanghai here:
1. Best Places in Shanghai
2. Where to go in Shanghai
3. Things to do in Shanghai
4. More things to do in Shanghai!
5. Getting around in Shanghai

From your application you will be able to travel to China and be working there within weeks of registering with us.
You will be met at the airport and taken to accommodation on arrival.
Full training and induction given.
A Chinese Classroom assistant with be always working with you, and helps plan your day to day work.
You will be either given accommodation or assisted in finding an apartment that is perfect for you.  Especially useful if you are travelling with a friend and wanting to share somewhere together.

You will also be introduced to the local shopping areas, helped with getting a bank account and telephone sorted, and the exciting social scene and expat communities.

Future development and opportunities
There is a definite 'pathway' to furthering your career and continuing in teaching if beginners enjoy their roles. We can help you get qualifications while you are actually working too.  You can develop a career in education leading to great further opportunities.

“How soon can this all happen and I start?”
You can get actually started and earning within a few weeks of registering with us - this includes time waiting for visa, travel to China and some induction training.

We will advise on how to apply for the visa to get you to China.
In many countries the process of receiving your visa can sometimes take only a few days.

“How do I manage a class if I haven’t done so before?”
You will be given an induction on arrival and easy training methods for getting started, which just takes a few days. The schools give you a Chinese classroom assistant at all times to be with you who speaks English, and will help plan the classes as well, so it’s all very simple.
1. Training example A
2. Training example B

“Why don’t Chinese teachers who speak English, or such as Philippinos who speak excellent English take the classes?
Chinese parents wish to send their kids to schools where there are ‘western’ faces with good clarity of English pronunciation to take the classes. That’s what is wanted, so that is what the schools must provide for the client families. As straightforward as that!

“Do we get our flights to China reimbursed?”
Learning centres generally pay back the cost of the flight to you after you have completed most or all of your initial contract period. Unfortunately, in the early years of bringing teachers across to China to teach, many took the offer and flight and then headed off on holidays!  The centres wish to see the candidates fulfil their side of the arrangements and then are happy to pay the expense back towards most or all of the flight cost.


Living in China - General Details

The Country
China has the largest population in the world. It is a huge country with an ancient and wonderful history, and cultural traditions which are fascinating and appealing. Much of these traditions still very much shape the way that people live, eat, think, exercise and even conduct their business relationships.

Geographically, China is the total range of vastly different landscapes from the Himalayas and western deserts to the long and varied Pacific coastline on the East. There are megacities such as Beijing and Shanghai, through to slightly smaller (Tier 2 cities) right across the country, and very many small rural farming towns and villages, often termed just ‘the countryside’ that are everywhere between. No other country in the world has locations as diverse as China.
If you want to see and experience something amazing and stunningly varied in every possible way, China is the place to go.

Chinese Climate
Weather in China goes from snowy and very cold winter temperatures in the far North (though with hot summers) right through to the tropical South with everything in between. Temperatures in the southern province of Guangdong and around Hong Kong and Macao rarely ever get cold, and are very humid and hot in the midsummer.

In central regions and including Shanghai there are distinct seasons. Hot and humid Summers, but beautiful and mild Springs and Autumns. The fairly short Winter can get down to zero with some snow flurries sometimes.

Chinese Culture
When you first move to China there might be many things that strike you as unusual but try to remember that the culture is just very different. ‘Westerners’ or ‘foreigners’ - as anyone not Chinese are called - are terms used constantly and are not in any way intended on being rude, that’s just the terminology they use.

Foreigners are common now in the big cities but outside of the large conurbations, westerners will often get stared at, especially if blue eyed and with blonde hair. You can often be asked to be in photographs with local people, keen to show their friends they have met ‘outsiders’. Just always keep an ‘open mind’.
There are a number of websites to help you to life in China such as www.shanghaiist.com and www.chengdu-expat.com

Chinese people will often be very happy to host you and show you around their city or neighbourhood. Do make the most of the wonderful Chinese hospitality.  While the ‘expat’ community is a good environment to have for friendships and support, try to enjoy the authentic Chinese experience and make new friends. Clothing and food will be cheaper in areas frequented by locals also, so explore markets with colleagues.

While the language is not easy, it is far better to try and understand it while you are amongst so many native speakers and immersed in the environment. Try to grasp the tones and have some frequently used phrases for ease of getting along on a daily basis.

Also remember to keep your passport with you at all times. In China everyone has an ID card which is used constantly in daily life. Your passport is your ID.

Safety
Personal and family safety is always considered when moving overseas to live and China is probably the most safe place to live in the world. Foreigners are not only welcomed but looked after with attention and assistance quick to come when needed. Bad behaviour is very frowned on and neither expected or wanted by Chinese and very rare to see.
It has been commented on many times over the years by foreigners living in such as Shanghai how safe it is at all times.

Foreigners are also much quicker to be assisted by police and authorities, keen to demonstrate how helpful their country is.

Finding A Home
The jobs that we have for you all come with either accommodation provided, or the assistance of our team of partners to get this sorted for you as soon as possible after arrival. Often you will be put up in hotel accommodation initially until suitable facilities are arranged for you, which you can view and inspect for yourself.
Our team in China will assist you in all your requirements and help all they can.

Moving to China - What you should take
You should get a good travelling allowance with your airline but it is probably best to start with just a couple of suitcases. You will pick up so much of what you need at very reasonable prices depending on where you shop. Other methods of sending belongings can be done such as through the service https://www.sendmybag.com

You will need some currency with you for the initial period before you start earning salary and getting it paid to your account.
If you do not have accommodation included with the job, while you will get assistance to find the right place to live you will need the deposit and the first two months rent paid up front.

Communication with all contacts
In a word – everyone uses WeChat. It is a social media platform extensively used in China where you can connect and communicate with people by live chat (phone), text, voice message, videos and pictures. It is telephone, email, SMS and WhatsApp all rolled into one. Quick and easy to set up and start using. And you can use it anywhere in the world to anybody else in the world. Get your friends back home to download the app too to keep in touch easily and free.

For those who are applying for jobs, please you should get it downloaded now, as it is the best method to hold the interview on and communicate with all contacts in China.

Basic Information for Teachers
• Currency – Chinese Yuan or Renminibi (RMB)
• Language – The official language of China is Mandarin, although in the Hong Kong area it is Cantonese
• Popular destinations for Learning Centre  jobs in China – the Tier 1 cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou, Guangzhou, Xian, Chengdu.

Document Legalisation (Notarised)
Document legalisation is the process of ‘converting’ your essential documents so that they are proved as legal and valid in China.
You can carry out this process yourself directly, or we can advise you with the whole process.

What You Need For Your Document Legalisation:
Original documentation plus one copy (in colour or black and white)
• A copy of your passport
• A complete document legalisation form

Accessing Healthcare
In public hospitals, emergency medicine can have a wait and uses a ‘pay-as-you-go’ system. This means that you often have to pay upfront to see a doctor and then before each part of your treatment, although for medicines etc is is quite a low cost.
You will get accident insurance paid for with your job.
The best way to find good, private, international doctors in your area is to ask your WeChat expat community.

Managing Your Money
Setting up a bank account in China is usually a straightforward process, all you need is your passport, proof of address and work visa, which you will get arranged by the company.  The company will actually also help you open the account.
Most bank workers speak enough English to make setting up your bank account relatively easy. You don’t always need to deposit money into a new account straight away, giving you greater flexibility. Popular Chinese banks include HSBC, Bank of China and ICBC.